Internacionales

NY Times

Summer’s Down Elevator

Make the most of the last weeks of summer, whether you’re dreading the end of the season or dancing about it.

Read More

Salman Rushdie Attack Recalls Murder of His Japanese Translator

Hitoshi Igarashi, who translated “The Satanic Verses,” was fatally stabbed at a university near Tokyo where he taught Islamic culture. The crime remains unsolved.

Read More

Restaurants That Are Institutions as Much as Places to Dine

Edmonton’s Bistro Praha is among the rare spots to find a formula that has ensured longevity in a generally difficult business.

Read More

What Happens If Shelling Continues at Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Plant?

Repeated shelling inside the plant’s complex over the past seven days has stirred new concerns of a nuclear accident.

Read More

Ukrainian Boy Starts a New Life Through Chess

After fleeing the war in Ukraine with his mother, Maksym Kryshtafor, 8, is using his passion for chess to help him assimilate into the United Kingdom.

Read More

Ivory Coast, a Big Cocoa Exporter, Tries to Move Up the Ladder

A new generation of Ivory Coast chocolatiers is striving to change an industry that has long left cocoa farmers in poverty.

Read More

American Lawyer Asim Ghafoor Freed From Detention in U.A.E.

Asim Ghafoor, who was convicted of financial crimes, was freed from a monthlong detention in Dubai after paying a $1.36 million fine.

Read More

Live Updates: Foreign Aid Helps Ukraine Stem Russian Advances

Ukraine has caused Russia to sustain heavy losses, with up to 500 Russian troops killed or injured every day, according to some estimates.

Read More

Shelling of Ukraine Nuclear Plant Raising Fears and Outrage

President Volodymyr Zelensky accused Russia of “nuclear blackmail” as the two sides traded blame.

Read More

Russian attack in eastern Ukraine kills 2 civilians, regional military leader says.

A video showed damaged homes and some areas that had been turned into ruins.

Read More

Kenya on Edge as Media’s Election Tally Suddenly Stops

An attempt at radical transparency by the election commission, which uploaded raw ballot numbers online, led to divergent tallies. “People are so tense that they cannot…

Read More

Climate Bill Heads to Biden’s Desk. There Is More to Be Done.

The bill will cut U.S. emissions but not nearly enough — it’s “like losing 20 pounds when you need to lose 100 pounds” one expert said.

Read More

8 Americans Reflect on U.S. Withdrawal From Afghanistan

They watched, waited and tried to help as the Afghan capital fell to the Taliban last year. “It was traumatic,” one said.

Read More

Montenegro Gunman Kills 10 on Street Before Being Shot and Killed

Two children were among the dead and six others were wounded, according to a state prosecutor. Witnesses said the gunman was randomly shooting at people.

Read More

Protests in Sierra Leone Over Rising Cost of Living Turn Deadly

Clashes between protesters and security forces over rising fuel and food prices have left two dozen people dead, and the government has imposed a nationwide curfew.

Read More

Ukrainian Children Bring a Play From a Bomb Shelter to Brooklyn

The group recently arrived in New York to perform “Mom on Skype,” first staged in April in Lviv, at the Irondale Center this weekend.

Read More

The Tumultuous Summer That Changed the World

Over the span of just a few weeks in 2021, the Taliban’s offensive shifted from rural threat to urban conquest before they walked into Kabul on…

Read More

With Afghanistan in Their Grip, Taliban Roll Back the Clock

Nearly a year since the Taliban seized power, new restrictions have reshaped the social fabric of the city. Schools and jobs are again off-limits for women,…

Read More

‘We Are the Flour Between Two Millstones’

Struggling to build a new life in the U.S., one Times reporter examines how a traumatic year has changed lives both physically and emotionally.

Read More

‘Day by Day, I Realized I Have the Freedom Here’

A group of Afghan employees from the Kabul bureau of The New York Times adjust after evacuation to the United States. Their new lives are challenging,…

Read More

‘In the United States, I Feel Optimistic’

As a child, Samira Rustami was discouraged from reading. But she studied business administration in Afghanistan, and now hopes to go into nursing.

Read More

‘My School Had No Chairs, No Blackboards, No Books’

Despite her struggles to get an education in Afghanistan, Mursal Rahim holds fast to her dream of becoming a lawyer.

Read More

‘I Plan to Encourage and Inspire Women With My Success’

Marwa Rahim’s hopes of a career in medicine were interrupted by the Taliban takeover. Now she is determined to resume her studies.

Read More

‘Regimes Like the Taliban That Impose Themselves on Nations Will Not Last Long’

Omar Ahmadi graduated from university with a degree in international relations, after evacuating from Afghanistan. He hopes to continue his studies in the United States.

Read More

What Happens If Shelling Continues at Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Plant?

Repeated shelling inside the plant’s complex over the past seven days has stirred new concerns of a nuclear accident.

Read More

Russia’s Economy Contracts Sharply as War and Sanctions Take Hold

The country’s gross domestic product from April through June declined 4 percent over last year, new government data shows.

Read More

Russia’s economy contracts sharply as war and sanctions take hold.

The country’s gross domestic product from April through June declined 4 percent over last year, new government data shows.

Read More

Estonia never needed to import gas by ship, until now.

Read More

A 1,300-Pound Walrus Could Be Killed if She Endangers the Public

Freya has been lounging on boats and eating mussels in Norway, but authorities have started to worry about her presence.

Read More

Five State-Run Chinese Giants to Delist From U.S. Stock Exchanges

The companies, collectively worth hundreds of billions of dollars, issued a flurry of statements amid tensions between Beijing Washington over regulation and broader political issues.

Read More

What I’m Reading

An old favorite and a cli-fi future.

Read More

In Wealthy City, a Marxist Mayor Wins Over Voters

Yes, this Communist politician wants to redistribute wealth, but a focus on housing, her own modest lifestyle and a hard childhood have helped her popularity.

Read More

A Hot, Dry Britain Is Set to Declare a Drought

The expected announcement by the government would allow water companies to tighten conservation measures. Temperatures on Friday were forecast to climb as high as 95 Fahrenheit.

Read More

Live Updates: Ukraine Estimates Sharply Higher Russian Casualty Toll in Crimea Blasts

A senior Ukrainian official put the toll at 60 dead and 100 wounded in a series of explosions that destroyed several Russian warplanes in a Moscow-controlled…

Read More

Ditching Fossil Fuels

The climate bill will make cleaner energy cheaper for everyone.

Read More

You Just Can’t Get the Staff

Australia’s labor and skills shortage has affected almost every sector. Signs of it are everywhere.

Read More

Showdown at the Mansion Gates: How Sri Lankans Rose Up to Dethrone a Dynasty

An army of nuns, farmers and middle-class professionals felt a duty to save their virtually bankrupt nation. But their fight is far from over.

Read More

Why are Russia and Turkey growing so close? Putin needs allies, and Erdogan needs bolstering.

Read More

Greece’s Mitsotakis Fends Off Accusations His Government Spied on Rivals

Revelations that the cellphone of a top opposition politician was tapped have shaken the government and stoked concerns over just how widespread such surveillance is.

Read More

U.N. Ship to Carry Ukrainian grain Directly to Horn of Africa

It is the first ship hired to carry the grain to countries badly affected by food shortages since a deal between Ukraine and Russia allowed shipments…

Read More

Your Friday Briefing

Moves by the U.S. to unseal the Mar-a-Lago search warrant.

Read More

Serbia’s Leader Rejects ‘Little Putin’ Label Amid Fears of Russian Meddling

President Aleksandar Vucic’s ties to Moscow raise awkward questions as the Kremlin appears to be stirring unrest in the Balkans to deflect attention from the war…

Read More

Serbia’s Leader Rejects ‘Little Putin’ Label Amid Fears of Russian Meddling

President Aleksandar Vucic’s ties to Moscow raise awkward questions as the Kremlin appears to be stirring unrest in the Balkans to deflect attention from the war…

Read More

Rhythm of War: A Thunderous Blast, and Then a Coffee Break

This is a war fought in a cycle of opposites: bursts of chaos from outgoing and incoming shelling, and then long lulls in which soldiers undertake…

Read More

How the war changed a Kyiv museum’s view of its past.

Read More

Shelling Threatens Ukrainian Nuclear Plant, and U.N. Pleads for Access

The chief U.N. nuclear monitor called for an immediate stop to fighting that risks a radiation disaster, as Russians and Ukrainians blamed each other for strikes…

Read More

Zelensky addresses the explosions in Crimea as photos suggest a major loss for Russia.

Read More

A Moscow court places a former state television journalist under house arrest over her anti-war protest.

Read More

Heavy Losses Leave Russia Short of Its Goal, U.S. Officials Say

The estimated deaths and injuries are stalling Russia’s progress in eastern Ukraine, military experts say, as fighting intensifies in the south.

Read More

Your Friday Briefing: U.S. to Unseal Trump Warrant

Plus Russia prepares for show trials and Taiwan does not rise to China’s provocations.

Read More

Rhythm of War: A Thunderous Blast, and Then a Coffee Break

This is a war fought in a cycle of opposites: bursts of chaos from outgoing and incoming shelling, and then long lulls in which soldiers undertake…

Read More

Don’t Blame Monkeys for Monkeypox, W.HO. Says After Attacks

The outbreak is centered on humans, not animals, health officials said, after a report that some monkeys were harmed in São Paulo, Brazil, out of fear…

Read More

All Hooting Aside: Did a Vocal Evolution Give Rise to Language?

The loss of certain muscles in the human larynx may helped give our species a voice, a new study suggests.

Read More

Italy Salutes a War Hero and the Values He Fought For

Mario Fiorentini, Italy’s most decorated resistance fighter, died at age 103 this week, and his mourners want his legacy to live on.

Read More

Italy Salutes a War Hero and the Values He Fought For

Mario Fiorentini, Italy’s most decorated resistance fighter, died at age 103 this week, and his mourners want his legacy to live on.

Read More

Palestinian Prisoners in Israel Use Hunger Strikes to Seek Freedom

For decades, Palestinians imprisoned by Israel have used these protests as a way to demand better living conditions and an end to indefinite detentions.

Read More

The New ‘Monuments Officers’ Prepare to Protect Art Amid War

A group of art experts have had intensive training to become part of the U.S. Army Reserve. It will be their job to help save cultural…

Read More

Russia Detains a Former Journalist Who Protested the War

Read More

Wildfires Rip Through France Again Amid New Heat Wave

In the southwest, a blaze that started in July has reignited because of the heat and the dry air, scorching an additional 26 square miles of…

Read More

Arctic Warming 4 Times as Fast as the Rest of the Planet, New Analyses Find

The warming at the top of the globe, a sign of climate change, is happening much faster than previously described compared with the global average, scientists…

Read More

U.S. Urges Rwanda and Congo to End Support for Warring Militias

Antony J. Blinken, the U.S. secretary of state, said he had warned the leaders of both nations over violence in the east of the Democratic Republic…

Read More